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Money in Serbia

Where to change money

The safest way to change money is in specialized changing places (menjacnice). Dinar is changing every day. You would have around 90 dinars for 1euro. Here is exchange rate.

Prices

Bear in mind that prices vary from place to place, but it’s like this usually.

  • Coffee 80-150 dinars
  • Bottle of water (0.5 litars) 30-45 dinars
  • Juice 120-200 dinars
  • Beer 80-150 dinars
  • Pljeskavica (typical serbian hamburger) 100-200 dinars
  • Burek (typycal serbian pie with cheese or meat) 80-150 dinars
  • Average lunch in kafana (typical serbian resturant) around 500 dinars

 

About dinar

The dinar (plural: dinari) is the currency of Serbia. An earlier currency also called dinar was the currency of the Principality, then the Kingdom, of Serbia between 1868 and 1918. The autonomous province of Kosovo and Metohia used the Deutsche Mark between 1999 and 2002, when it adopted the euro. The current Serbian dinar is a continuation of the last Yugoslav dinar.

Front
Back
10 Dinara Portrait of Vuk Stefanović Karadžić; members of the First Slavic Congress held in Prague in 1848 and vignette of the letters Vuk introduced. Banknote was originally released in 2000 in predominantly ochre-yellow colour with brown and green tones. It is gradually replaced with slightly lighter 2006 issue.
20 Dinara Portrait of Petar II Petrović Njegoš; 2006 edition features his figure on the back, instead of the statue from the Mausoleum on Mount Lovćen. Banknote was originally released in 2000 in predominantly green colour with ochre-yellow, and with brown and yellow tones, and it is somewhat darker than the National Bank of Serbia issue.
50 Dinara Portrait of Stevan Stojanović Mokranjac; figure of Stevan Stojanović Mokranjac, a motif of Miroslav Gospel illumination scores. Banknote was first released in 2000 in predominantly light violet colour, with magenta and yellow tones. It was slightly redesigned in 2005.
100 Dinara Portrait of Nikola Tesla; a detail from the Tesla electro-magnetic induction engine. Banknote was first released in 2000 in predominantly light and marine blue, with greenish and ochre-yellow tones. It was slightly redesigned in 2003, 2004 and 2006.
200 Dinara Portrait of Nadežda Petrović silhouette of the Gračanica Monastery. Banknote was first released in 2001 in predominantly amber, red, and brown colours and grey-blue tones. It was slightly redesigned in 2005.
500 Dinara Portrait of Jovan Cvijić stylized ethnic motifs. Banknote was released in 2004 with blue-green tones and in greenish and yellowish colours.
1000 Dinara Portrait of Đorđe Vajfert, an outline of Vajfert’s beer brewery, hologram image of St. George slaying a dragon; details from the interior of the main building of the National Bank of Serbia. Banknote was released in 2001 in predominantly bright red colour, with yellowish and grey-blue tones. It was slightly redesigned in 2003 and 2006.

2000 Dinara The figure of Milutin Milanković, a fragment of the stylized display of the sun disc, and in the central part dominates the presentation of Milanković’s work “The Way of the North Celestial Gender”, the large coat of arms of the Republic of Serbia in the upper left corner of the banknote, on an olive background..

5000 Dinara The figure of Slobodan Jovanović, a fragment of the building of the Federal Assembly and a stylized display of interior of the Assembly Hall; sign of the National Bank of Serbia / the big coat of arms of the Republic of Serbia in the upper left corner of the banknote, on a purple background.